Subscribe
Our Journey on Scolamanzi II
Our Journey on Scolamanzi II

On our way to College Fiord

One after the other

One after the other

15th June 2016

We left Valdez after having fuelled Scolamanzi. It was one of the more pleasant fuelling experiences we have had so far – the fuel nozzle had the option to click it into free flow – which meant that you don’t need to hold on to the nozzle to control the flow of the fuel for 45+ min.

After a long day of cruising which included a few stops to cast a lures at salmon splashing near the boat (to no avail ), we made it to Coghill Bay. A tricky anchorage with depth changing pretty quickly from anchor depth to mud racking depth. At least it was good holding and College Fiord was just around the corner.

With the weather forecast calling for perfect weather the next two days, we went to bed excited about our next 2 days in what is thought to be the jewel in the crown of Prince William Sound. It did not disappoint as the pictures will testify.

I love the names around College Fiord which reflected the main universities at the time. The biggest of the two main glaciers is Harvard Glacier and the other one Yale Glacier. You will also find Barnard Glacier (one of the smaller ones) and Tuition cove near Yale.

And so we started this beautiful cruise up to Harvard. Dodging icebergs and growlers but not nearly as many as we have seen around the likes of Endicott arm, Tracy arm or Columbia Bay. Reading the cruising guide, we were probably lucky to get through and up close and personal with both those glaciers. It was beyond spectacular to see the two big ones right next to each other, divided by College point.  Once again – a thousand too many pictures later we knew we were in for a sensory overloaded day.

This is known as the most scenic and glacially active area in the sound. And it certainly lived up to the expectation! Hearing the groaning, cracking and thundery sounds coming from these glaciers certainly touches one’s core – a sound you will never forget (on a par with thunder, the roar of a lion in the wild or an elephant’s trumpet – unforgettable )

As we made our way back we passed a flotilla of small yachts. One radioed Scolamanzi and it was a pleasant surprise to hear a female voice asking if we have any Australians on board. Turned out we had mutual friends from our Caribbean sailing days who asked her to keep a lookout for Scolamanzi when they cruise in Prince William Sound. I wished it was Matt and Karin in person, but it never the less was a wonderful surprise.

Chat to the skipper of the Ocean Beuty tender TRASK

Chat to the skipper of the Ocean Beuty tender TRASK

As we were making our way to Granite Bay after a magic day, there were gill netters active all along the coastline. We stopped and had a chat to one of the fish tender boats who told us the season has been slow so far, probably due to El Nino affecting the Pacific sea temperatures. They mentioned that we need to look out for their “shrimp pots” on a buoy at the entrance to Granite bay. That was just what we needed to hear. We were told to put our prawn traps close to those who knows best and that is what we have done as soon as we anchored. The results – 30 odd beautiful big prawns were pulled up the next morning at 6am!

Entrance to Granite Bay

Entrance to Granite Bay

Granite bay is exactly that! A bay with massive granite cliffs all round and even on the surface! The holding was good though and a lovely protected anchorage.

Leave a Reply